B2B public relations

Your PR program should include a combination of the following items and actions:

  • Stand-alone press releases, email pitches and/or media advisories
  • Press kits (including such items as company and product or service backgrounders, management bios, product or people photographs, press releases and reprints of articles about your company)
  • Setting up your management as a source of experts for media interviews
  • Relationship building with editors
  • Customer success stories
  • Feature articles written by your management (or ghostwritten for them)

And here are 13 things not to do

  1. Don’t use a writer within the company just because they’re an employee. If they’re not up to the task, freelance writers may get better results.
  2. Don’t hire a freelance writer who doesn’t have experience with direct marketing or promotional writing. Having an experienced writer will have a direct benefit in terms of attendance.
  3. Don’t assume your audience already understands the value of participating in your event. Provide thorough copy and detailed benefits to show there’s valuable information and that your event is worth the time and energy to attend.
  4. Don’t let grammatical errors or typos slip through.
  5. Don’t assume URLs, phone numbers, email addresses and directions are correct and working properly until you test each one.
  6. Don’t focus on selling the company. Instead, sell the benefits of the event to bring in the attendees.
  7. Don’t leave out positive comments from others who’ve attended.
  8. Don’t have a dull headline without clear benefits. Generate excitement and interest to make a good first impression. For example, “7 Marketing Mistakes That Can Cost You Big Bucks–and How to Avoid Them.”
  9. Don’t use formal invitations or postcards. Generally, registrations plummet with these types of pieces because there’s no room for details.
  10. Don’t wait too long to start promoting your event. Get on decision-makers’ calendars before they commit themselves elsewhere.
  11. Don’t promote too early, then fail to keep in touch.
  12. Don’t rely on only one method of communication. Emails get caught in spam filters for unpredictable reasons and direct mail may not be delivered properly or thrown out accidentally.
  13. Don’t forget to remind them your event is approaching as time draws near. Follow up with key prospects via telephone, and sending last-minute, “See you there!” e-mails to registrants.

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